ISSN: 20430701
Online ISSN: 2043071X
First published in 2011
2 issues per volume
Current Issue:
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Volume 4 | Issue 1
Call for Papers

For our general Call for Papers please click here.

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Call for Papers – Short Fiction in Theory and Practice (2016) Special Issue
 
Short Fiction by Caribbean Women Writers: New Voices, Emerging Perspectives
 
Submission Deadline: November 1st 2015.
 
 
As most critics and practitioners of the short fiction in the Caribbean argued, the short story is the foundational form of Caribbean literature. Widely published in late nineteenth and early twentieth-century newspapers, magazines and journals, the short story in this period was the form used by writers to practice their literary craft. Short fiction also provided a forum to engage a wide and not necessarily literary audience with social and political issues, concerns about the nation and the demands for a national culture.  Short fiction continues to be a popular literary form in the Caribbean, now used to express the ambiguities and complexities of contemporary regional realities and to provide a forum for experimentation and innovation.
Though often marginalised, Caribbean women have always participated as writers and critics of this cultural form. This special issue seeks to bring together scholars and practitioners of the short story form in order to draw critical attention to new or hitherto marginalized short fiction writers and to provide new perspectives on Caribbean women’s short fiction.
While all submissions are peer-reviewed, we aim to be inclusive. Contributions are welcome from individuals who do not consider themselves academics, and may take the form of personal commentaries, reflections, interviews and reviews, as well as conventional academic essays.
We are pleased to consider proposals from those publishing or promoting the short story, as well as from short-story writers
 
Short Fiction by Caribbean Women Writers: New Voices, Emerging Perspectives
 
The editors welcome articles of 4,000 – 8,000 words (including notes and references)
 
·      New writers/new writing
·      Short fiction in translation
·      Critical reception, prizes and public acclaim
·      Disruptive, subversive short story forms
·      Short fiction in cyberspace
·      Publishers and publishing
·      Orality and Oral story-telling forms
·      Lost or hidden voices
 
·      Caribbean minorities
·      Short fiction as popular culture
·      Indo-Caribbean women writers
·      Crime Fiction as Short Fiction
·      Transcultural connections
·      Short Fiction in Comparison: geographies, cultures,               languages and historical period
·      Gender and sexual identities
·      Short story cycles and sequences
 
The editors will also consider:
 
·       Original creative work by Caribbean women writers 
·       Interviews with writers
·       Translations of short fiction not previously published in          English
 
Please contact the editor in the first instance, with proposals for translations, interviews or creative work.

Articles should be submitted on disc or by email attachment (as a Word document) to either of the editors (details below):
 
Suzanne Scafe
Department of Culture, Writing and Performance
London South Bank University
103, Borough Road
London SE1 OAA
 
Aisha Spencer
School of Education
Faculty of Humanities and Education
UWI, Mona, Kingston 7
Jamaica
West Indies

 

Submission Deadline: November 1st 2015.
 
************************************
 
Call for Papers: The 14th International Conference on the Short Story in English, (July 13–16, 2016), Shanghai, China, at East China Normal University (ECNU)
Theme: 'Influence and Confluence in the Short Story: East and West'
This conference will bring writers of fiction in English (Irish, British, American, Canadian, Australian, Caribbean, South-African, Indian, Sri Lankan, Indonesian, etc.) and writers who have had (or will have for this event) their work translated into English together with scholars of the short story, and all will join in reading sessions, roundtable discussions and panels, including ones devoted to translation. The 14th International Conference on the Short Story in English will also host a number of sessions, both in the more traditional format (with presentation of papers) and in other formats involving performance, dance, art, films, etc., having in mind that the form of the short story is not necessarily confined to the limits of the written page but may open up to manifold fields of expression. This will be the first Asian venue for the conference.
The organizers welcome and encourage proposals and abstracts for the 2016 conference in Shanghai, China. See http://www.shortstoryconference.org/ for details.
 



Short Fiction in Theory and Practice
provides an international forum for all those writing, reading, translating or publishing the short story, in all its diversity – including flash fiction, the novella, cycles, sequences, anthologies and single-author collections; hypertext, popular fiction (e.g. science fiction, horror), the prose poem, the non-fiction story and other hybrid genres. It looks at the short story from the practitioner’s viewpoint; we are concerned with the ongoing process and philosophy of composition rather than the ‘post-event’ dissection of literary texts.

Contributors also discuss cultural and political contexts, especially the short story’s role as an outlet for marginalized or dissident voices. Additionally, the journal addresses the interface between the short story and other media, looking at film, radio and stage adaptations, and at work which crosses artistic or disciplinary boundaries. In keeping with a form which owes so much to Chekhov, Maupassant, Kafka and Borges, the journal takes a transnational approach, considering fiction first published in languages other than English, and publishing translations. There is scope for other creative work when it is accompanied by, or embodies, a critical element or investigation of poetics, but those wishing to submit such work should consult the editor in the first instance.

While all submissions are peer-reviewed, we aim to be inclusive. Contributions are welcome from individuals who do not consider themselves academics, and may take the form of personal commentaries, reflections, interviews and reviews, as well as conventional essays. We are pleased to consider proposals from those publishing or promoting the short story, as well as from short-story writers.

Until recently, debates on the short story tended to be motivated by the need to validate its credentials as a specific genre, clearly differentiated from the dominant prose form, the novel. Because the short story was sometimes dismissed as an apprentice piece, or a stunted attempt at a novel, short-story theory was driven by the search for generic definition. Now we have the confidence to move on from a preoccupation with classification, celebrating difference rather than imposing formal unity. With that in mind, Short Fiction in Theory and Practice intends to highlight innovation in short-story writing, critical research and transmission across national, linguistic and generic boundaries.
 

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