ISSN: 20517068
Online ISSN: 20517076
First published in 2014
3 issues per volume
Current Issue:
Volume 1 / Issue 1 Free Issue
Call For Papers
Call for Submissions
We invite contributions for Dance, Movement and Spiritualities. Standard articles will be in the range of 5000-8000 words, including a 150 word abstract, six indicative key words, institutional affiliation and a short biography. 
 
Articles for issue 1.3 should be submitted by March 19th, issue 2.1 by May 25th, and issue 2.2 July 1st 2014.  
 
Volume 2 Issue 1: Special issue “Dance, Embodiment, Movement, Health and Spiritualities”
 
Submission date 25th May 2014
The new international Journal of Dance Movement and Spiritualities is inviting practitioners, researchers and writers from diverse dance backgrounds and practices to submit articles about Dance, Embodiment, Movement, Health and Spiritualities for a special issue. Standard articles will be in the range of 5000-8000 words, including a 150 word abstract, six indicative key words, institutional affiliation and a short biography.
 
The Journal aims to be a clear voice in the fields of Dance, Movement Somatics, Health and Spiritualities, raising the profile of spirituality within Dance, Embodiment and Health, through diverse articulations of the nature and the impact of spiritual awareness in these domains. Spiritualities receive comparatively little attention in Western health practices, so this special edition of the Journal aims to give a platform to those practitioners and researchers who are actively and creatively working with spirituality at the centre of their practice/research to disseminate their ideas and findings. The Journal seeks to embrace diversity of experienced and felt spiritualities and encourages health practitioners (such as somatic and body psychotherapists, dance movement psychotherapists, and somatic arts practitioners) in particular to submit articles about their practice. It is our intention that through diverse articulations of professional practice in mainstream and complementary contexts, we will open up debate and discussion within Dance and Health about the process and the efficacy of re-centering spirituality at the heart of health interventions and methods. The eagerness to bring dialogue between traditional and alternative approaches to healthcare is fuelled by increasing evidence which suggests that treatment of the whole person: body mind emotions and spirit, is beneficial for long term prognosis in many instances of ill health. Discussion of methodologies suited to discovering more about Dance and Spiritualities are most welcomed, as well as innovative methods for recording, digesting and articulating the experiences of spirituality within Dance, Embodiment, Movement and Health.
 
For further information on submission details and article ideas, please contact Amanda Williamson sacredpublishing@live.com and Jill Hayes J.Hayes@chi.ac.uk.
 
Volume 2 Issue 2: Special Issue: 'Dance, Movement and Buddhism'. Guest editor: Harrison Blum
Submission date July 1st  2014
Standard articles will be in the range of 5000-8000 words, including a 150 word abstract, six indicative key words, institutional affiliation and a short biography. For further information on submission details and article ideas, please contact and Harrison Blum harrisonablum@gmail.com. All articles should be submitted to Harrison Blum by July 1st  2014.
 
Both Buddhism and dance invite practitioners into present moment embodiment. The Buddha’s pivotal teaching on the Four Foundations of Mindfulness begins with mindfulness of the body, which the Buddha taught can lead to happiness, wisdom, and awakening. Dancers spend decades cultivating such kinaesthetic awareness. Amidst this inherent synergy between Buddhist and dance practice, the climates of Buddhism and dance in the West are aligning in new ways. Most Western Buddhists are lay people. As such, there are by now multiple generations of Western Buddhists who have deep Buddhist practices alongside other life pursuits. There are practitioners sitting intensive Buddhist retreats and meditating daily as they work as choreographers, dance teachers, theatre directors, and body workers. There are also Buddhist lamas, nuns, teachers, chaplains, and professors integrating movement forms into their Dharma teaching. While Buddhism has always focused on the body, embodied practice modalities are now increasing and spreading in novel ways. 
 

Strong submissions will present a depth of practice in both dance/movement and Buddhism. Amidst this depth, we are open to the wide range of Buddhist traditions and dance/movement styles. We are interested in hearing both your thoughts about and experiences with Buddhism and the moving body. "How do your Buddhist practice and your dance work mutually inform each other?" What promise and challenge does this interweaving hold?

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