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New issue of Philosophy of Photography 7.1-2

Intellect is delighted to announce the new issue of Philosophy of Photography 7.1-2 is now available. 

For more information about this issue, please click here or email katy@intellectbooks.com

 

Articles in this issue include (partial list):

 

Visibility and realism: Photography and the problems of transparency

Authors: Duncan Wooldridge

Page Start: 11

 

Photography’s initial claim to represent has been derived from a privileging of the visible world, which, it might be argued, is reinforced by the limited visibility of the camera. The proliferations of utilitarian photographies, therefore, are necessarily also the elimination of the non-visible. Such a notion of visibility, when contested, might provide the starting point for a reconception of the photographic in which the apparently indexical medium is filtered through alternative relationships to representation, transparency and, ultimately, even the discourse of realism. This article proposes that an alternative conception of realism might sceptically underline the limitation of the photographic apparatus in relating to but also limiting the world.

 

Akeley inside the elephant: Trajectory of a taxidermic image

Authors: Bernd Behr

Page Start: 43

 

As a process distinct from its poured cousin, sprayed concrete involves using compressed air to propel cement with various chemical admixtures at a surface. Used in tunnelling for rock surface stabilization, and above ground for securing slopes and fabricating fake rockeries, its chimeric character ranges from the polished landscapes of skateparks and swimming pools to mimicking cast concrete in structural repair work. The origins of this industrial process lie with taxidermist Carl E. Akeley (1864–1926), who invented it during his pioneering work in the proto-photographic field of natural habitat dioramas at the Chicago Field Museum in 1907. Further cementing André Bazin’s notion of photography as embalmment, Akeley also invented a unique 35mm cine camera during his time at the American Museum of Natural History, New York. The essay explores this historical intersection between photography, taxidermy and architecture, and its wider implications for thinking through photography’s material contingency.

 

What is twenty-first century photography?

Authors: Daniel Rubinstein

Page Start: 155

 

In the twentieth-century photography was the de-facto face of representation, as the visual arm of an industrial society that thought to reproduce the world as commodity for the consumption by individuals. However, in the twenty-first century this logic of mechanical reproduction is augmented by the (fuzzy) logic of algorithmic processing, which does not require individuals and commodities for its operation, but converts both to packets of data. The task of photography today is not to represent the world as an image, but to explore the conditions that make something like an ‘image’ possible.

Posted by Katy Dalli at 16:12 (0) comments
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