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Codpieces, Chopines and Corsets!
Celia Stall-Meadows, author of Why Would Anyone Wear That? is interviewed by American TV station Fox23

Celia Stall-Meadows recently gave a fascinating interview on American TV station Fox23 where she discusses her new book Why Would Anyone Wear That?: Fascinating Fashion Facts.

You can watch the Interview online here

About the book...

 

With a blend of wisdom and wit, Why Would Anyone Wear That? explores extreme fashions from around the world. The Victorian era was by no means alone in strange sartorial choices. Throughout history, men and women have turned to clothing and accessories to adorn and accentuate parts of the body. Some of the fashions, like bloomers, were surprisingly functional. Others, like powdered wigs and hobble skirts, were inconvenient and uncomfortable. And a few particularly painful practices could even permanently disfigure the wearer, like brass coils worn in Burma to lengthen the neck and the custom of binding of women’s feet to fit tiny lotus slippers in Song dynasty China. Presenting dozens of the most peculiar fashions, including shoes, hats, jewelry, undergarments, and outerwear, the book provides insightful commentary, placing the garments and accessories in the proper historical, social, and cultural context.

If you’ve ever wondered why the codpiece was created or the leisure suit went out of style, this book will answer that question and many more. Fully illustrated and packed with fun facts, Why Would Anyone Wear That? introduces readers to the fascinating stories behind some of the world’s weirdest fashions.

 

Read more Posted by James Campbell at 19:23 (0) comments
Shanghai Street Style is The Moment Magazine's Book of the Month

Shanghai Street Style is The Moment Magazine's Book of the Month. You can read the review here www.themomentmagazine.com.

Shanghai is swiftly cementing its status as a global fashion destination—its first fashion week was in 2011—and this book brings together more than one hundred full-colour photographs showcasing the remarkable diversity of styles seen on its streets. Alongside the photographs are short pieces of critical commentary by Vicki Karaminas and Toni Johnson-Woods, shedding light on the city’s changing culture and how this is expressed through the clothing choices of ordinary city-dwellers going about their daily routines. The result is a stunning street-level look at the trends shaping Shanghai’s fascinating fashion scene, with interesting echoes of East meets West and old meets new. The book will be published in February 2013 and is available to pre-order via our website.

Find out more...

Read more Posted by James Campbell at 11:29 (0) comments
Call for Papers: Special Issue of Interactions: Studies in Communication and Culture
The Host City: (Re)Locating Media Events in the Network Era

Deadline: March 15, 2013

Guest Editor: Robert Moses Peaslee, Texas Tech University
Assistant Guest Editor: Brendan Kredell, University of Calgary

As media events (Couldry, Hepp & Krotz, 2010; Dayan & Katz, 1992) of all stripe proliferate around the world, a variety of stakeholders jockey for position and advantage in the geographical and cultural contexts chosen to host them. Media events, as Dayan and Katz famously characterized them, were defined in part by their liveness, their physical remoteness from the majority of their “audience,” their interruptive nature, and their status, nonetheless, as pre-planned (prominent examples today would include the Olympic games, the annual film festival at Cannes, the Super Bowl, and music festivals such as Chicago’s Lollapalooza). Many of these events are consistently located, well-established and have assumed a defensive position aimed at maintaining brand identity and prestige. Others, such as the Olympics, change locations, while others (such as Austin, TX’s Fantastic Fest) are ascendant, and still others are nascent at best. Each host community, however, has a unique relationship to their event(s), and each of these relationships provides fertile ground for investigating the role of media events in promoting discourses of community identity, establishing infrastructural and external networks, reifying the importance of being mediated, utilizing the "local” to speak "globally,” and a variety of other processes.

This special issue of Interactions: Studies in Communication and Culture seeks research articles engaging the media events literature and investigating the relationship between event and location, between location-as-text and location-as-infrastructure, between location and audience, between location and industry, and other relevant relationships, all in the context of networked media structures. Some relevant topics areas include, but are by no means limited to:

Host city branding and image management
Networked media events: the impact of social media
Media events and host city governance
Discourses of place in the media event
“Thereness” and virtuality in the media event
Media events as sites of resistance
Community and ritual
Media events, promotion and (g)local media
Fannish practices in/around the media event
The political economy of the media event
The audience experience: affect, memory, place
Media events and mobility
Comparative analyses of host cities in media event contexts

Prospective authors should submit an abstract of approximately 500 words no later than January 15, 2013 to robert.peaslee@ttu.edu. Abstracts will be reviewed by the editors on a rolling basis until then.

Those authors whose abstracts are accepted will be required to submit full articles of 6000-7000 words (inclusive of notes, appendices, and works cited) no later than March 15, 2013.

Articles will be subject to a blind peer-review process, meaning that acceptance of an abstract does not denote acceptance of the full article. We anticipate accepting approximately 12 abstracts in order to produce an issue of 6-7 articles.

Any revisions required by the reviewers will be expected by mid-June in order to publish the issue in early 2014.

Authors wishing to propose relevant book reviews for the issue should also submit an abstract by January 15, 2013.

Questions and abstracts should be directed to robert.peaslee@ttu.edu.

Also, anyone interested in serving as a reviewer should send a brief letter of interest along with a CV to bkredell@ucalgary.ca.
 

Read more Posted by James Campbell at 15:45 (0) comments
Piercing Time: Paris after Marville & Atget 1865-2012... Update
Video content now avalable to watch online

Piercing Time: Paris after Marville & Atget 1865-2012... A project by Peter Sramek that examines documentary photography through juxtaposing contemporary rephotographs of Paris with photos taken by Marville and Atget. Peter Sramek has uploaded four fascinating videos detailing the project, take a look here.

Peter Sramek's photographs revisit Parisian views by Charles Marville from 1865-77. Join the campaign to support quality production of the book Piercing Time.

The b
ook documents 184 street locations of Paris and will be illustrated with almost 500 images – by Charles Marville (1860s-70s), Eugène Atget (early 1900s) and Peter Sramek (present day). Related historical maps will locate the images accurately. Texts have been written by historians Min K Lee and Shalini Le Gall, as well as Peter Sramek and interviews with Parisians will bring in a contemporary popular view of urban change. Historical images are coming from the Musée Carnavalet with whom Sramek has worked closely and also from the Bibliothèque Historique, Bibliothèque Nationale and MOMA (NYC).

Please visit the website to find out more and help support this project: http://www.indiegogo.com/parisaftermarville

Read more Posted by James Campbell at 09:39 (0) comments
Texas educators embrace Signs of Change

Signs of Change: New Directions in Theatre Education by Joan Lazarus, is being well received by theatre educators. Joan is Associate Professor of Theatre and Head of Theatre Studies at The University of Texas at Austin, and when writing Signs of Change she researched and received contributions from hundreds of theatre educators and teaching artists.  Her book provides practical advice and lesson plans for theatre teachers.

One of the early reviews stated 'This book should be put in the hands of every person who has the inclination and opportunity to make theatre with young people. It is a 'must-have' in theatre-training institutions.' –Julia Perlowski, Reba R. Robinson Outstanding Secondary School Drama Educator.   It seems that educators in Texas agree, with one Texas school district purchasing copies for every theatre teacher in the district, along with key administrators.  Congratulations to Joan on the success of her book and for sharing her passion for theatre education with teachers everywhere.

Read more Posted by James Campbell at 17:22 (0) comments
Paris after Marville & Atget
A new book to be published by Intellect

Paris after Marville & Atget... A new book to be published by Intellect

Peter Sramek's photographs revisit Parisian views by Charles Marville from 1865-77. Join the campaign to support quality production of the book Piercing Time.

The b
ook documents 184 street locations of Paris and will be illustrated with almost 500 images – by Charles Marville (1860s-70s), Eugène Atget (early 1900s) and Peter Sramek (present day). Related historical maps will locate the images accurately. Texts have been written by historians Min K Lee and Shalini Le Gall, as well as Peter Sramek and interviews with Parisians will bring in a contemporary popular view of urban change. Historical images are coming from the Musée Carnavalet with whom Sramek has worked closely and also from the Bibliothèque Historique, Bibliothèque Nationale and MOMA (NYC).

Please visit the website to find out more and help support this project: http://www.indiegogo.com/parisaftermarville

 

 

Read more Posted by James Campbell at 11:29 (0) comments
Extracts from our latest Performing Arts journals
Applied Theatre Research and Punk & Post-Punk

Intellect's Performing Arts portfolio has two forthcoming journal issues, which will be available in time for Christmas. The first is Punk & Post-Punk 1.3, which is a special issue devoted to punk in Russia. The second is the inaugural issue of our latest Performing Arts journal, Applied Theatre Research. Both include excellent and diverse academic articles but to get our readers prepared here are extracts from the editorials that will be published in each issue respectively.


Applied Theatre Research, Editorial: Innovation, continuity and conversation
By Penny Bundy and John O’Toole, Griffith University, Brisbane, Australia

Welcome, readers, to a journal that is both new and not-new, familiar and unfamiliar. This is the first number of the first volume of Applied Theatre Research, published by Intellect Books. It shares much of its editorial policy, its acronym and most of its title with a journal you may already know and use: The Applied Theatre Researcher, formerly (from 2000 to 2012) published by Griffith University in Australia, and since 2003 also incorporating the IDEA Journal. As the editors of both, we are delighted to be setting out with Intellect, with a fresh and handsome look, a much greater visibility and simplified ease of access for both readers and authors.  We are also very pleased to be retaining our links with Griffith University, and with IDEA (The International Drama/Theatre and Education Association): from time to time, we will publish special editions devoted to IDEA Congress papers and IDEA projects, and we intend to remain a significant voice in the international drama and theatre education conversation. Our policy – as well, we hope, as our appeal to our readership – has been updated, but not much changed; as our website indicates, Applied Theatre Research is:

the worldwide journal for theatre and drama in non-traditional contexts. It focuses on drama, theatre and performance with specific audiences or participants in a range of social contexts and locations … Educational uses of theatre are an important part of the journal’s brief.

We have retained and expanded the distinguished and truly global team of peer reviewers on our Advisory Board. From this edition onwards, we are now publishing regular reviews of significant applied theatre publications, and we welcome Professor Michael Balfour as Reviews Editor. The Editorial Board now comprises Professor Balfour, Associate Professor Peter O’Connor as our General Adviser and ourselves. 

 

Punk & Post-Punk Editorial: The elephant in the room? ‘Post-socialist punk’ and the Pussy Riot phenomenon
By Ivan Gololobov and Yngvar B. Steinholt


A special issue with a number of articles on punk in Russia, but no mention of Pussy Riot? Is this another example of academic research out of touch with the burning issues of our time? In one sense: yes. The time frames involved in peer-reviewed academic publishing are ill-suited to the swiftly changing agendas of world media. The abstracts to this issue were written around the time of Pussy Riot’s foundation and the initial manuscript deadline preceded the infamous punk prayer and subsequent arrests by a month. In another and more fundamental sense: no. Pussy Riot is not part of the Russian punk or music scenes as such. Whilst the band calls itself ‘punk’ and its actions take the form of flash gigs in public places; this form of punk rock is a vehicle for actions of social protest following the demands of a political-artistic agenda. Below we provide a brief overview of the Pussy Riot phenomenon in the context of Russian punk. For those interested, an extended exploration of the argument will be available shortly on the web pages of the journal Popular Music and Society.

Over the last few months much attention in Russia and abroad has been given to the arrest, trial and conviction of three members of the feminist punk-band Pussy Riot. They were eventually sentenced to two years imprisonment for religious hatred following their performance of a ‘Punk prayer’ before the altar of the Christ the Saviour cathedral in Moscow on 21 February 2012. Pop and rock stars from Madonna, Paul McCartney, Peter Gabriel and Bjørk to Red Hot Chilli Peppers and Faith no More have expressed their support for the arrested women, alongside Russian artists and celebrities such as Yuri Shevchuk, Nikita Dzhigurda and Viktor Shenderovich.

Read more Posted by James Campbell at 12:21 (0) comments