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Launch: Journal of Greek Media & Culture
King’s College London, Council Room K2.29 Strand campus
 
06/10/2014 (17:30-19:30)
 
This event is open to all and free to attend.  Please direct enquiries to chsevents@kcl.ac.uk.
 
Launch: Journal of Greek Media and Culture
Followed by the presentation of the the Schilizzi scholars, 2014
 
The Journal of Greek Media and Culture is an interdisciplinary peer-reviewed journal that aims to provide a platform for debate and exploration of a wide range of manifestations of media and culture in and about Greece. The journal adopts a broad and inclusive approach to media and culture with reference to film, photography, literature, the visual arts, music, theatre, performance, as well as all forms of electronic media and expressions of popular culture. While providing a forum for the close analysis of cultural formations specific to Greece, JGMC aims to engage with broader methodological and theoretical debates, and situate the Greek case in global, diasporic and transnational contexts.
 
The launch will be introduced by Roderick Beaton (King's College London), Rosa Tsagarousianou (University of Westminster), and Lydia Papadimitriou.
 
It will be followed by a panel of three papers presented by:
Olga Kourelou (University of Sussex)
Maria Boletsi (Universiteit Leiden)
Eleftheria Ioannidou (University of Birmingham) 
 
Principal Editor: Lydia Papadimitriou (Liverpool John Moores University)
Issue 1.1 editors: Lydia Papadimitriou, Vassiliki Kolocotroni, Yannis Tzioumakis
 
Editorial Board:

Dimitris Eleftheriotis (University of Glasgow)
Vassiliki Kolocotroni (University of Glasgow)
Dimitris Papanikolaou (University of Oxford)
Eleni Papargyriou (King's College, London)
Yannis Tzioumakis (University of Liverpool)
The launch will be introduced by Roderick Beaton (King's College London), Rosa Tsagarousianou (University of Westminster), and Lydia Papadimitriou.

It will be followed by a panel of three papers presented by:
Olga Kourelou (University of Sussex)
Maria Boletsi (Universiteit Leiden)
Eleftheria Ioannidou (University of Birmingham)

Read more Posted by Jessica Pennock at 11:30 (0) comments
Upcoming Argentinian Cinema Events

If you are interested in Argentinian cinema join Gary Kramer and Beatriz Urraca, co-editors of Directory of World Cinema: Argentina for a number of upcoming events. 

This Friday 12th September they will be introducing a screening of White Elephant and participating in a post film discussion at International House, Philadelphia. Book now.
 
The editors will be taking part in a Q&A with Argentine director Natalia Smirnoff at the American Film Institute in DC. Find out more.
 
And finally, in November they will be teaching a course on Argentinian cinema at Bryn Mawr Film Institute. Register here.
 
 
Read more Posted by Jessica Pennock at 10:59 (0) comments
LEAF Workshop: Creating An Art/Science Cloud Curriculum
September 20, 2014

Intellect would like to inform you of an event happening at Cornell Council for the Arts.

In collaboration with the CCA and in conjunction with its inaugural biennial, Leonardo Education and Arts Forum (LEAF) (a working group of Leonardo ® /ISAST) continues its successful international education event-initiative at Cornell University on September 20, 2014.

The workshop will be led by associate professor Paul Thomas, director of Fine Art Honours, University of New South Wales and visiting assistant professor of Studio Art and director of the Cornell Council for the Arts, Stephanie Owens. The event will bring contemporary scholars, artists, scientists and theorists in art and science together to create the aims, objectives, attributes, bibliography and course work necessary to establish a fundamental set of considerations that would enable students to meaningfully engage in an integrated study of studio art and research-based science.

For more information visit the event page here.

Read more Posted by Alice Gillam at 10:17 (0) comments
Call for Papers: Drama Therapy Review 1.2 & 2.1
Call for Papers Issue 1.2
 
Drama Therapy Review seeks articles that reflect the journal’s intention to document and disseminate drama therapy research, promote scholarship about drama therapy theory and practice, encourage inner and inter disciplinary dialogue, and provide a forum for lively debate in the field. DTR profiles and critically reflects upon current and emerging practices involving the intentional and therapeutic uses of dramatic improvisation and performance in clinical, educational, community, organizational, and research contexts.
 
Questions to consider:
 
●      What are the health benefits and risks of dramatic reality?
●      What are the goals of drama therapy and who establishes these?
●      How do drama therapists understand health, illness, ability and disability?
●      When, where and for whom is drama therapy indicated?
●      What are the dominant narratives that inform our practice, pedagogy,
and approaches to research?
●      How might imagination and dramatic improvisation increase well being or decrease specific kinds of distress? 
●      How does race, gender, ability, socioeconomic status and/or age influence research and practice?
●      How might children and other vulnerable groups be more involved in research about their own experiences?
●      What consideration should be given to aesthetics in drama therapy?
●      What are the ethical implications of performing and witnessing private stories in public spaces?
 
These are but some of the questions that continue to arise in the field. DTR welcomes contributions from a wide range of scholarly work including, but not limited to: 
 
●      quantitative studies
●      qualitative analysis
●      practice and arts-based research
●      Reviews
●      Reports
●      Interviews
●      Commentaries
 
The editorial board assesses articles for the quality of scholarly and critical content. The principal language is English; however, the journal will consider articles in other languages for which reviewers can be accessed, with abstracts in English. Editorial assistance may be given to those whose work is worthy of inclusion, but for whom the language of the article is not their first, or for whom the written word is not their forte. There is an explicit policy of making the articles stylistically accessible and readable to the range of readership. 
 

To submit work for consideration please download our submission guidelines or contact the editor, Nisha Sajnani: dtr@intellectbooks.com. The submission deadline is February 1st, 2015.

 
Call for Papers for Special Issue 2.1:
Borderlands: Diversity and Social Justice in Drama Therapy
 
This special issue of DTR will reflect on the contribution of drama therapy to the promotion of diversity and co-existence. Drama therapy involves the intentional use of dramatic improvisation and performance to deepen empathy, gain perspective, reveal group dynamics, and to work through conflict in order to alleviate distress and initiate desired changes. This issue aims to elevate discourse on diversity and inclusion by inviting contributions that critically engage with questions of power and privilege in the field of drama therapy.  This issue will also call attention to the ways in which drama therapeutic techniques are used to respond to historical and current forms of social control and exclusion. How might drama therapy contribute to a broader social discourse on culture and the politics of difference?
Key questions to consider:
 
●      Who defines the purpose and goals of drama therapy?
●      What circumstances influence who has access to drama therapy?
●      Who benefits from drama therapy research and performance?
●      Whose worldviews are under/represented in the field and how does this influence how drama therapists practice?
●      When might the practice of drama therapy reinforce harmful marginalization or encourage social conformity?
●      How might the practice of drama therapy contribute to reducing stigma or facilitate advocacy?
●      When does the practice of drama therapy disrupt or unsettle dominant narratives related to class, race, ability, gender, age, religion, legal status, sexual orientation and other forms of difference?
●      How is cultural competency incorporated in the training of drama therapists?
●      How do dominant paradigms influence training and research cultures in drama therapy?
●      What are some of the culturally situated notions of the body, affect and performance in the field?
●      How are power relations communicated in aesthetic choices and approaches to audience engagement?
●      How does therapeutic performance reveal, conceal and re/present difference?
●      What don’t we talk about? Are there some themes or experiences that are unplayable or underrepresented? What are the ethics of attempting to do so within a drama therapy frame?
 
DTR welcomes contributions from a wide range of scholarly work, including, but not limited to:
 
●      Quantitative studies
●      Qualitative studies
●      Practice/arts-based research
●      Reviews
●      Reports
●      Interviews
●      Commentaries
 
The editorial board assesses articles for the quality of scholarly and critical content.
The principal language is English; however, the journal will consider articles in other
languages for which reviewers can be accessed, with abstracts in English. Editorial
assistance may be given to those whose work is worthy of inclusion, but for whom the language of the article is not their first, or for whom the written word is not their forte. There is an explicit policy of making the articles stylistically accessible and readable to the range of readership.
 
To submit work for consideration please download our submission guidelines or contact the editor, Nisha Sajnani: dtr@intellectbooks.com. The submission deadline for Issue 2.1 is August 1, 2015.  
Read more Posted by Jessica Pennock at 11:54 (0) comments