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Affecting and Curating, Feeling the Curatorial
Whitechapel Gallery, London, Thursday January 19 2017

To mark the publication of a two-part issue on affect and curating in the Journal of Curatorial Studies, a special event Affect and Curating, Feeling the Curatorial’ is being held at Whitechapel Gallery on Thursday January 19th 2017.

 

The event will bring together a range of speakers to consider how museums, galleries, art world events and artworks function as sites for the transmission of affects. If 'affect' operates independently from meaning, identity or thought, on the level of pre-conscious physical responses and resonances, how might focusing on it challenge and complicate understandings of curating and curatorial approaches?

 

The panel will consist of Journal of Curatorial Studies co-editors Jennifer Fisher, Helena Reckitt, Lisa Blackman and Nina Wakeford. Together they will be discussing the 'affective turn' in curating and society more broadly.

 

To find out more about the event, including how to book tickets, click here. 

Read more Posted by Katy Dalli at 16:42 (0) comments
Visual Arts Journals Institutional Free Trial

Intellect is pleased to announce the introduction of a 90-day free trial of 10 of our highly regarded Visual Arts journals, specifically for institutions. Sign up for free before 31st March 2017.

The journals cover a range of subjects from art in education to comics, illustration and creativity in virtual worlds; and from the practice of contemporary painting, craft and fashion, to Islamic architecture and Chinese contemporary art. All journals are peer-reviewed and international in scope, and include both established and new, emerging titles launched in the past two years. Throughout the 90-day free trial you will have access to the most up to date content, including the most recent complete volume plus any new issues that are published during the trial period.

Please ask your librarian to click here to access the trial. For further information, including how to sign up, click here.

Visual Arts journals available within the free trial include:

Art, Design & Communication in Higher Education
Craft Research
Critical Studies in Fashion & Beauty
International Journal of Education through Art
International Journal of Islamic Architecture
Journal of Contemporary Chinese Art
Journal of Contemporary Painting
Journal of Illustration
Studies in Comics
Metaverse Creativity (new title: Virtual Creativity from volume 7, 2017)

Read more Posted by Katy Dalli at 16:38 (0) comments
Kiosk Literature of Silver Age Spain: Modernity and Mass Culture
Edited by Jeffrey Zamostny and Susan Larson

Intellect is thrilled to announce that Kiosk Literature of Silver Age Spain: Modernity and Mass Culture Edited by Jeffrey Zamostny and Susan Larson is now available to pre order through our website!

The so-called "Silver-Age" of Spain ran from 1898 to the rise of Franco ub 1939 and was characterized by intense urbanization, widespread class struggle and mobility, and a boom in mass culture. This book offers a close look at on maniddestation of that mass culture: weekly collections of short, often pocket-sized books sold in urban kiosks at low prices. Published in a wide range of genres and formats this series was later censored by the Franco dictatorship for their erotic and anarchist fiction.

Chapters within this title include: 'Between Secrets ans Simulations: Women Writers in La Novela de Noche' by Carmen M. Pujante Segura and 'Celebrity, Sex, and Mass Readership: The Case of Álvaro Rentana' by Noël Valis.

 

 

 

Read more Posted by Becky at 09:44 (0) comments
CFP: Drama Therapy Review 4.1

 

 

DTR Call for Papers Special Issue 4.1: Drama Therapy with Couples and Families


Submission deadline: August 1st, 2017.


Guest Editor: Dr. Dan Wiener

 

This Special Issue of Drama Therapy Review seeks articles about specific applications of drama therapy to promote the wellness of couples and families. Such applications include: prevention and enrichment programs; relationship enhancement; psychoeducation; diversion and prevention programs; conjoint psychotherapy; and the training of practitioners.  Also sought are papers informed by dramatic and theatrical praxis that present novel methodologies and conceptual perspectives in the study and treatment of family relationships. DTR readers particularly welcome papers which link theory and practice, and such papers are often enhanced by case material. 


DTR welcomes contributions from a wide range of scholarly work including, but not limited to:

quantitative studies

qualitative analysis

practice and arts-based research

Reviews

Reports

Interviews

Commentaries


The editorial board assesses articles for the quality of scholarly and critical content. The principal language is English; however, the journal will consider articles in other languages for which reviewers can be accessed, with abstracts in English. Editorial assistance may be given to those whose work is worthy of inclusion, but for whom the language of the article is not their first, or for whom the written word is not their forte. There is an explicit policy of making the articles stylistically accessible and readable to the range of readership. 


To submit work for consideration please download our submission guidelines and email dtr@intellectbooks.com


For more information on this journal please go here.

 

Read more Posted by Becky at 10:37 (0) comments
CFP: Drama Therapy Review 3.2

DTR Call for Papers Issue 3.2

Submission deadline: February 1st, 2017.

Drama Therapy Review seeks articles that reflect the journal’s intention to document and disseminate drama therapy research, promote scholarship about drama therapy theory and practice, encourage inner and inter disciplinary dialogue, and provide a forum for lively debate in the field. DTR profiles and critically reflects upon current and emerging practices involving the intentional and therapeutic uses of dramatic improvisation and performance in clinical, educational, community, organizational, and research contexts.

Questions to consider:

What are the health benefits and risks of dramatic reality?

How does working with imagination, fiction, and metaphor differ from direct enactment?

What are the goals of drama therapy and who establishes these?

How do drama therapists understand and assess health, illness, and change?

When, where and for whom is drama therapy indicated?

What are the dominant narratives that inform our practice, pedagogy,and approaches to research?

How does dramatic improvisation increase well being or decrease specific kinds of distress?  

How do social differences influence research and practice in drama therapy?

How can children and other vulnerable groups be more involved in research about their own experiences in drama therapy?

What are the aesthetics of drama therapy?

What are the ethical and social implications of performing and witnessing private stories in public spaces?

DTR welcomes contributions from a wide range of scholarly work including, but not limited to:

quantitative studies

qualitative analysis

practice and arts-based research

Reviews

Reports

Interviews

Commentaries

The editorial board assesses articles for the quality of scholarly and critical content. The principal language is English; however, the journal will consider articles in other languages for which reviewers can be accessed, with abstracts in English. Editorial assistance may be given to those whose work is worthy of inclusion, but for whom the language of the article is not their first, or for whom the written word is not their forte. There is an explicit policy of making the articles stylistically accessible and readable to the range of readership. 

To submit work for consideration please download our submission guidelines and email dtr@intellectbooks.com

For more information on this journal please go here.

 

Read more Posted by Becky at 10:13 (0) comments
Memefest/Swinburne International Symposium/Workshops Intervention, 21–28 November

Memefest, the minds behind Intellect's forthcoming Food Democracy: Critical Lessons in Food, Communication, Design, Art and Theoretical Practice, are again hosting their international extradisciplinary symposium, workshops and interventions, at Swinburne University, Melbourne. The event will run from 21–28 November, and aims to connect students, academics and members of the community with refugee and asylum seeker networks and Aboriginal networks in order to research, learn and create socially transformative public interventions. 

See here for more! 
http://memefest.org/en/memeblog/2016/10/memefestswinburne-international-symposium-workshops-intervention--november--swinburne-university-hawthorn-campus/ 

Read more Posted by Amy at 17:48 (0) comments
Journal of Design, Business & Society 2.2, out now!

Intellect is pleased to announce that the new issue of the Journal of Design, Business & Society is now available in print and online!

Articles in this issue include: 'A Socially Responsible Design to Rebuild Cultural Self-Confidence: A Case Study on the Design of a Visual Revitalization Project' by Fang Xu, Fijan Mon and Yuanyuan Chen, 'Diagnostic Design: A Framework for Activating Civic Participation through Uban Media' by Ian McArthur and Martin Tomitsch and 'Social Responses to Nature; Citizen Empowerment through Design' by Robert Phillips, Michael Brown and Sharon Baurley.

For more information on this issue please click here.

 

 

Read more Posted by Becky at 17:00 (0) comments
Dance, Movement & Spiritualities 2.3

Intellect is delighted to announce the new issue of Dance, Movement & Spiritualities 2.3 is now available.

 

Articles in this issue include: ‘Why people dance - evolution, sociality and dance’ by Andrée Grau, ‘Dancing through myself: Memory, identity, spirituality’ by Barbara Sellers-Young and ‘Positive Race Relations through Cuban Music: A Perspective from the Relational-Cultural Theory (RCT)’ by Demi Simi and Jonathan Matuiitz.

 

For further information on this journal click here.

Read more Posted by Becky at 16:13 (0) comments
The Biannual International Society for Metal Music Studies Conference at the University of Victoria June 9-11, 2017
Boundaries and Ties: The Place of Metal Music in Communities

The Biannual International Society for Metal Music Studies Conference at the University of Victoria (Previously held at Bowling Green in 2013, and Helsinki in 2015) June 9-11, 2017.

Metal Studies at the University of Victoria and ISMMS are pleased to announce the following Call for Papers: 

Metal music is a crucible for identity and community. At its core it aims to press boundaries. These boundaries, in turn, serve both to reinforce belonging and to exclude nonparticipants. The goal of this conference is to explore different ways metal music fans experience and create communal bonds, and the relationship of these bonds with other types of communal bonds (ethnic, religious, and national for example). How can these multivalent bonds reinforce or destabilize each other? How do lyrical and symbolic themes and communal bonds aid or hinder the process of or reclaiming identity or regaining voice?  How do artists grapple with and recontextualize some of the problematic origins of the genre?

The organizers would like to invite proposals for papers of twenty minutes devoted to any aspect of metal music, identity and community. We would also like to encourage students and postgraduates to submit an abstract.

 

We invite topics that include but are not limited to:

·         The relationship between local and global metal scenes. 

·         The formation of and allegiance to specific sub genres with in metal.

·         Heavy metal and national or ethnic identity.

·         Margins and periphery within metal communities.

·         The role of “narrative(s) of origin” of metal or its sub-genres in fostering a sense of communal identity within metal.

·         Metal in First Nations communities

·         The interrelationships between metal music and sporting/leisure contexts

·         Metal music as political community

·         The relationship between embodying a cultural identity and heavy metal fandom

·         How developments in technology influence metal communities (such as the dynamics across online and offline metal            communities)

·         Metal and DIY/participatory archives

·         Lo-fi recording and the bonds between metal artists and audiences

·         The entanglements of analog and digital (re)productions of metal

·         Lyrics as a call for communal action

·         Plurilingual Metal as communal connections or divisive agents

Please submit a title and an abstract of 200- 250 words (if an accompanying reference list is included, it does not go towards the word count) to boundariesandtiescon@uvic.ca by December 15, 2016. Applicants will be notified of acceptance by February 1st, 2017.

Read more Posted by Becky at 11:58 (0) comments
Theatrical Reality - Free extract

To celeberate the release of our new title, Theatrical Reality, we are giving away a section of the introduction for free! To buy a copy of the book please click here

This book is concerned with theorizing the ways in which the aesthetics of theatrical representation are complicated and informed by the embodied and spatial conditions of its realization. The following chapters will examine the various ways in which theatre makers attempt to organize the spectator’s experience of reality within performance. By analysing how the threshold spaces of performance shape the spectator’s perception of the performer’s actions and experiences, the book seeks to explore some of the ways in which representation and meaning in theatre are informed by the spectator’s embodied and affective engagement with the art form.

Throughout the book I will make reference to a variety of critical and theoretical perspectives, drawing on material from the fields of phenomenology, cognitive psychology, neuroscience, geography and sociology. However, it should be noted that many of the arguments developed with this book were sparked by my pedagogical engagement with the practice of making theatre. My work as a theatre maker has always been rooted in personal and idiosyncratic concerns; but as a university lecturer, tasked with teaching others to make theatre, I have been forced towards greater pragmatism. In recent years, I have discovered that, when attempting to help students realize their aims in performance, my most useful questions were always concerned with the intended role of the spectator in performance. It is this realization that drove me to start writing this book.

If the theatre maker is to assess the success of his work, he1 must be able to judge its impact on an audience. Without having a sense of the different ways in which the spectator is being invited to deploy his emotions and imagination when watching or participating in performance, the theatre maker will remain incapable of judging his work’s effectiveness. I believe strongly that the practitioner must be able to theorize the nature of the spectator’s engagement with the world represented onstage. This is not due to any kind of belief in the intrinsic value of theory. Instead, it relates to the view that a clear understanding of form is creatively enabling. In order to guide the reception of meaning onstage, the practitioner must understand how theatre functions. It is for this reason that this book ultimately focuses on responding to two key questions: What do we mean by theatricality? And: How might we define the experience of reality within the context of theatrical performance?

Theatre is a medium where invisible worlds are rooted in visible objects, where the material becomes metaphor, and where the intimate and personal are made universal. Through referencing theatre’s ability to overcome and accommodate such oppositions, the book will argue that theatrical space establishes unique modes of reality for both performer and spectator. It will also argue that unpicking the complexity of these connections is paramount if we are to assess some of the ways that meaning, place, character and narrative are constructed and conveyed within theatrical performance.

In order to develop my argument, I will draw on a wide range of case study examples, crossing the boundaries between disciplines and attempting to make links between distinct forms of performance practice (from dance, to theatre, to performance art). I would like to make it clear that my aim is not to diminish the importance of recognizing the distinctions between separate aesthetic forms and disciplines of study. Instead, I hope that by encouraging you to cross the borders between theatre and dance, or neuroscience and literary analysis, you will be able to analyse the material, aesthetic and social dimensions of theatrical performance – thus developing your understanding of the complex ways in which spectators and performers occupy and share physical and imagined spaces during performance.

My hope is borne from my experiences as both a theorist and practitioner. The reflexive nature of this dual life has continually encouraged me to question the practical value of theory. It concerns me that so little of the contemporary application of theory within theatre and performance studies is written for the explicit benefit of the theatre maker or audience. Perhaps I am alone in this response, but I invite you to consider how many times you have read an elegantly argued and diligently researched piece of scholarship before questioning whether its insights could usefully be applied by a spectator, performer or designer. Of course, it depends by what one means by ‘useful’; but, for me, so much of the application of theory to performance seems to me to be an abstract exercise – an exercise in which the insights of theorists are applied to theatrical experience in the same way that one might complete a complex jigsaw puzzle. I believe that the application of theory needs to be approached with greater pragmatism, but also greater adventure. As theorists, practitioners and spectators, we should be helping each other to think more efficiently and more fully about how the complexities of theatre function so that the experience of making and watching theatre can become richer and more powerful. 


With this in mind, the book aims to demonstrate that the best theatre practitioners are/ were often the best theorists. To paraphrase George Devine, great theatre must have an attitude – and such attitudes are necessarily formed from philosophies. Although my concern in this short text is to cross-reference different approaches to thinking about the nature of reality in the shared spaces of performance, I hope that the reader will come away from this book with a clearer sense of how the spectator fits within the philosophies of some of the twentieth and twenty-first century’s key theatre makers. I hope that by questioning what reality might mean in the context of theatre, the implicitly stated theories of figures such as Adolphe Appia, Konstantin Stanislavski and Bertolt Brecht can be freshly illuminated.

Read more Posted by Eden Joseph at 16:03 (0) comments