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Screen Education
From Film Appreciation to Media Studies
Now Available
Price £26.50, $35.50
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ISBN 9781841502373
Paperback 432 pages
230x174mm
Published January 2009
Imprint: Intellect
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Chapter Titles     |      Reviews     |      Comments

Film and media studies now attract large numbers of students in schools, colleges and universities. However the setting up of these courses came after many decades of pioneering work at the educational margins in the post-war period. Bolas’ account focuses particularly on the voluntary efforts of activists in the Society for Education in Film and Television and on that Society’s interchanging relationship with the British Film Institute’s Education Department. It draws on recent interviews with many of the individuals who contributed to the raising of the status of film, TV and media study. Through detailed examination of the scattered but surviving documentary record, the author seeks to challenge versions of the received history.

Chapter titles
1. 'Cinema under Scrutiny' - Page 11
Terry Bolas
2. 'Film Appreciation' - Page 37
Terry Bolas
3. 'Searching for Room at the Top' - Page 69
Terry Bolas
4. 'Discrimination and Popular Culture' - Page 99
Terry Bolas
5. 'Film in Education – The Back of Beyond' - Page 131
Terry Bolas
6. 'The University in Old Compton Street' - Page 163
Terry Bolas
7. 'The Felt Intervention of Screen' - Page 197
Terry Bolas
8. 'Screen Saviours' - Page 227
Terry Bolas
9. 'Seft Limited' - Page 259
Terry Bolas
10. 'A Moral Panic Averted' - Page 293
Terry Bolas
11. 'Comedia delves arbitrarily' - Page 319
Terry Bolas
'Screen education: a timeline 1930–1993' - Page 357
Terry Bolas
'Expansion of media studies – the statistics' - Page 371
Terry Bolas
Reviews
'Bolas provides a hugely stimulating account pointing to how we can understand the connections between career academia and public institutions, and the emergence and development of media and film as discipline. [...] Screen Education is written in such an engaging, personal and compassionate way that by the time the reader is immersed in the closure of SEFT in chapter 11, it may not be surprising to describe the experience as a dramatic novel or journey. Screen Education presents a comprehensive historical analysis that poses many contemporary questions, and it is a highly instructive read that will hopefully prompt consideration of the context and content of teaching in media studies across education.'Dr Daniel Ashton, Bath Spa University

'Drawing on memory, oral history, archival investigation and textual analyses, the author reconstructs how the study of film and television, and subsequently media, shifted its position ‘from the margins of the curriculum in secondary education in the 1950s to become firmly established and widely available in higher education’ (p. 2). Bolas approaches this transformation through the lens of two key organisations, the Society for Education in Film and Television (SEFT) and the British Film Institute (BFI) Education Department. In the 1930s–1950s, both started to operate across a wide range of activities connecting film and children. [...] While the study of media during the 1980s achieved a much higher profile in secondary, further and higher education, the positions of SEFT and BFI Education began to be challenged. Formerly involved in both SEFT and BFI, Terry Bolas writes from an insider’s perspective about these issues. [...] Precisely because of his inside knowledge, Bolas is able to tell a revealing story, with a number of today’s high-ranking academics in pioneering roles. At the same time, he puts into question some persistent conventional wisdoms, such as the idea that so-called ‘positive’ approaches to media education have only recently displaced inoculation strategies. Within this context, it is particularly enlightening to see how current debates in the media education movement were foreshadowed many decades ago.' – Hans Martens, University of Antwerp

'provides an extensive history of how film studies grew to its prominent place in Britain'SCOPE

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