Latest books 
Morrissey
Fandom, Representations and Identities
Now Available
Price £16, $23
Purchase this book
ISBN 9781841505961
Paperback 342 pages pages
230x174mm
Published March 2012
Imprint: Intellect
Chapter Titles     |      Reviews     |      Comments

Known for his outspoken and often controversial views on class, ethnicity and sexuality, Morrissey has remained an anti-establishment figure who continues to provoke argument, debate and devotion amongst critics and his many fans. Focusing exclusively on Morrissey’s solo career, the collected essays in this important book - now in paperback - make for a rich reading of Morrissey and his highly influential creative output. Working across a range of academic disciplines and approaches (including musicology; ethnography; sociology and cultural studies) these essays seek to make sense of the many complexities of this global icon.

To read the rest of the 'Notes' review click here

Chapter titles
Introduction: But Don’t Forget the Songs that Made You Cry and the Songs that Saved Your Life …
Eoin Devereux, Aileen Dillane and Martin J. Power
Chapter 1: ‘Suedehead’: Paving the Pilgrimage Path to Morrissey’s and Dean’s Fairmount, Indiana
Erin Hazard
Chapter 2: “The Seaside Town that They Forgot to Bomb”: Morrissey and Betjeman on Urban Regeneration and British Identity
Lawrence Foley
Chapter 3: In the Spirit of ’69? Morrissey and the Skinhead Cult
John H. Baker
Chapter 4: Fanatics, Apostles and NMEs
Colin Snowsell
Chapter 5: The “Teenage Dad” and “Slum Mums” are Just “Certain People I Know”: Counter Hegemonic Representations of the Working/Underclass in the Works of Morrissey
Martin J. Power
Chapter 6: In Our Different Ways We are the Same: Morrissey and Representations of Disability
Daniel Manco
Chapter 7: “My So Friendly Lens”: Morrissey as Mediated through His Public Image
Melissa Connor
Chapter 8: “Because I’ve only got Two Hands”: Western Art Undercurrents in the Poses and Gestures of Morrissey
Andrew Cope
Chapter 9: Mozart: Adorno Meets Morrissey in the Cultural Divisions
Rachel M. Brett
Chapter 10: Speedway for Beginners: Morrissey, Martyrdom and Ambiguity
Eoin Devereux and Aileen Dillane
Chapter 11: No Love in Modern Life: Matters of Performance and Production in a Morrissey Song
Eirik Askerøi
Chapter 12: ‘Vicar In A Tutu’: Dialogism, Iconicity and the Carnivalesque in Morrissey
Pierpaolo Martino
Chapter 13: Smiths Night: A Dream World Created Through Other People’s Music
Dan Jacobson and Ian Jeffrey
Chapter 14: Talent Borrows, Genius Steals: Morrissey and the Art of Appropriation
Lee Brooks
Chapter 15: ‘I’m Not The Man You Think I Am’: Morrissey’s Negotiation of Dominant Gender and Sexuality Codes
Elisabeth Woronzoff
Chapter 16: Melodramatic Morrissey: Kill Uncle, Cavell and the Question of the Human Voice
Johanna Sjöstedt
Chapter 17: ‘You Have Killed Me’ – Tropes of Hyperbole and Sentimentality in Morrissey’s Musical Expression
Stan Hawkins
Reviews
'Morrissey: Fandom, Representations and Identities will find a rightful spot on many a university reading list. But it’s a crossover book too... its appeal must stretch beyond the confines of the Academy. Morrissey is an important and influential figure, and this is an important book.' – Philip Kiszely, Punk & Post-Punk

'‘The thinking man's take on the thinking man's musician...’' – Hot Press

'[…] an uncompromising, detailed, and challenging examination of the many textual layers, symbolic codes, and cultural resonances of the Morrissey canon. This is indeed rich material by any standards. Drawing on a range of disciplinary approaches, including musicology, sociology, media and cultural studies, as well as gender studies and queer theory, these essays range across the full spectrum of Morrissey’s work. […] this is quite a sensitive work, as befits its subject matter, and individual authors articulate their own, sometimes complex, relationship with the subject matter and their own engagement with it. In bringing this work together, the editors have made a substantial contribution to writing in the genre, and to the potential for serious engagement with popular music in an academic context. ' – Brian O'Neill, Irish Communications Review

'Broad ranging, intellectually satisfying ... highly recommended both for scholars ... and for fans' – Kevin Schwandt, Notes

Tags:
Your tags: Please login or register if you don't have a user account.
1 comments:
james.campbell  Said...

A fabulous book - I loved working on this project almost as much as i did reading the finished product.

Congratulations to the editors.

March 15, 2012 10:29
Powered by Google

Related Book

Morrissey

Related Book

Brit Wits


Related Book

The Art of Nick Cave



Related Journal

Punk & Post Punk

World Cinema Directory