ISSN: 20523998
First published in 2015
3 issues per volume
Volume 2 Issue 3
Cover Date: September 2016
Community at the extremes: The death metal underground as being-in-common
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Authors:  Nathan Snaza And  Jason Netherton 
DOI: 10.1386/mms.2.3.341_1

Keywords
death metal,community,brutality,non-human agency,aesthetics,tape trading,materialism

Abstract
This article asks what the early death metal underground teaches us about the relations between community and aesthetics. After tracing the emergence of death metal as a genre, the article examines the accounts of musicians, artists and recording engineers collected in Jason Netherton’s Extremity Retained (2014). Drawing on contemporary theories of non-human agency, research in animal studies, and Continental philosophies of community, the article focuses on ‘brutality’ as a crucial marker of death metal’s political significance, arguing that this involved experiments with new ways of embodiment that outstrip humanist presuppositions about what a body can do. Then, the article examines how international tape trading networks allowed for the emergence of forms of ‘being-in-common’ that cannot be understood in merely human terms. Finally, the article argues that the death metal underground’s particular importance lies in its linking of more-than-human practices of community with a focus on death and negativity.
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