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New issue of the Journal of Interdisciplinary Voice Studies 2.2

We are delighted to announce that the new issue of the Journal of Interdisciplinary Voice Studies (2.2) is now available.


This special issue of JIVS focuses on ‘Voicing Belonging: Traditional Singing in a Globalized World’.


For more information about this issue, please click here or email katy@intellectbooks.com


Articles within this issue include (partial list):


Constructing the singing voice: Vocal style, aesthetics and the body in Okinawan music

Authors: Matt Gillan

Page Start: 103


Japan’s southernmost prefecture of Okinawa has a thriving traditional music culture that has become popular throughout the country, and has also become the basis for a more modern Okinawan pop music scene. Most Okinawan musical genres strongly emphasize vocal technique – vocal timbre, inflection and ornamentation are all singled out as being cultural markers that differentiate Okinawan genres from each other and from the vocal music of the Japanese mainland. Vocal techniques have long been theorized and mediated through both written and verbal aesthetic discourses, and the voice continues to be a way that regional identities, lineage affiliations and other aspects of Okinawan society are negotiated. In this article I draw on fifteen years as a researcher and performer of Okinawan folk and classical vocal traditions, as well as recent recorded interviews with performers and music producers, to analyse how these discourses function, and how they have interacted with changes in performance practice since the early twentieth century.


South Indian singing, digital dissemination and belonging in London’s Tamil diaspora

Authors: Jasmine Hornabrook

Page Start: 119

 

This article explores the digital dissemination of Carnatic – South Indian classical – and Tamil devotional songs, singing and learning in London’s Tamil diaspora. Carnatic and Tamil devotional singing are key cultural practices in this highly dispersed, or ‘scattered’, diaspora, and are strong markers of collective Tamil cultural identity. The voice embodies the distinct South Indian style and is, therefore, highly iconic in South India, Sri Lanka and their diasporas. To demonstrate how the voice and singing are experienced in multiple locations, the article describes specific examples of how ‘traditional’ vocal practices are disseminated through the Internet. These examples are Skype lessons and online broadcasting of Tamil devotional singing. Through engaging in traditional singing practices in online environments, it is argued that vocal practices are central to a sense of belonging in multiple diasporic localities and to musical, spiritual and cultural diasporic imaginaries.

 

The transmission of voicing in traditional Gwoka: Between identity and memory

Authors: Marie Tahon and Pierre-Eugène Sitchet  

Page Start: 157


This article examines the transmission of voicing – the use of voice during the execution of a song – in Gwoka music. Considered at the time of French colonization as mizik a vié nèg (‘vagrants’ music’) this traditional music from Guadeloupe recently underwent a rehabilitation process that led to the idea that it reflected the ‘roots’ and the ‘authenticity’ of the Guadeloupean people. Gwoka music has since then become an important part of Guadeloupe’s cultural heritage, to the point that it is now listed on the UNESCO World Heritage List. The present work explores the relation between voicing in Gwoka and the questions of identity and memory. We suggest that traditional singers are chroniclers of their time, and memory smugglers who educate the audience by evoking values through their lyrics and voice. Gwoka music is strongly attached to political movements of resistance since its emergence. Previous generations of singers have not only transmitted vocal practice and lyrics, but also Creole language. Finally, we relate voicing to the preservation of Guadeloupean identity and to resistance in the face of Western domination.

Posted by Katy Dalli at 15:00 (0) comments
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