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Critical Studies in Men's Fashion 4.2 – out now!

We are delighted to announce that the new issue of Critical Studies in Men’s Fashion (4.2) is now available.

This special issue of CSMF focusses on ‘Fashion as Art’.

 

For more information about this issue, please click here or email katy@intellectbooks.com.

 

Articles within this issue include (partial list):

 

’Till They See a Man in Spite of His Clothes’: Twentieth Century Media and Raymond Duncan

Authors: Megan Martinelli Campbell

Page Start: 113

 

Raymond Duncan (1874–1966) entered the twentieth century clothed in a Greek inspired dress influenced by the past, yet strikingly modern for his time. Duncan, a leader at his own self-sufficient art colonies in Paris and Nice, spent 62 years of his life dressed in the daily uniform of hand-woven tunics and leather sandals that he and his followers created for themselves. Duncan first adopted his social and gender-defying philhellenic costume in 1903, and coverage of Duncan and his companions’ dress in newspapers and other media outlets continued throughout his lifetime. This article explores Duncan’s defiance of social conventions via his clothing, and the evolving attitudes of the twentieth-century mindset, from scandalised shock at Duncan’s trouser-less appearance during the 1910s to bemused curiosity from the 1920s onwards. As a male artist travelling through cultural centres such as Paris, London, Berlin and New York during the twentieth century, the attention afforded by the western press to Duncan’s ‘draperies’, long hair and sandalled feet contributed to the artist’s notoriety and success, and revealed a gradually evolving social interpretation of bohemian dress, which, by the time of Duncan’s death in the late 1960s, approached understanding and acceptance.

 

Identity and imaginary: Rhetorics of menswear in literature and film

Authors: Kenneth M. Kambara and John Deming

Page Start: 153

 

We critically examine the use of menswear in literature and film as an expression of Weltanschauung, a view of the world by creatives in the literary and visual arts. While depictions and presentations of menswear serve as rhetorical devices in literature and film, this occurs within a sociocultural meaning system, where the creator not only captures elements of social realities but also serves to influence them. Our enquiry informs how taste is defined through the distinctions made in social processes involving cultural capital through creative production. This involves context-rich analyses of how menswear is used to craft identities and tropes embedded within a historicized imaginary that may have never even existed. Such an examination of menswear as an art form in media allows for a nuanced critical analysis of gender performativity and issues of trajectories of meanings over time. Our theoretical framework builds on the fashion system and cultural reproduction work of Roland Barthes and Pierre Bourdieu, respectively. We use several key case studies of twentieth-century authors and film projects to develop new theory that has implications for understanding menswear as an art form with societal significance, with implications for better understanding gender, identity, culture and the everyday praxis of individuals and institutions.

 

Gender fluidity in Men’s fashion: From Shakespeare’s modern English to the new millennium

Authors: Patti Jordan

Page Start: 171

 

This study explores how art, performance and the fluid construction of gender identities have significantly influenced men’s fashion over the trajectories of both time and place. Comparisons are made to the similarities and differences between everyday dress, and dress for performance. Studies of particular epochs indicate noteworthy changes in men’s fashion, such as sixteenth-century dress and costume in Shakespearean England, the nineteenth-century Aesthetic Movement, twentieth century counterculture and the new millennium. Emphasis is placed on the transformative development of New English, and how this linguistic trend, as well as the increase in world travel, may have augmented changes in men’s dress. Western fascination with eastern influences and emerging concepts of exotic dress during the nineteenth-century Aesthetic Movement to the present are noted. Other pivotal moments, such as the development of twentieth-century fashion subcultures, mirror specific contemporary shifts in men’s attitudes towards the construction of gender identity and fashion influence. Cross-analysis is introduced through visual and verbal linkages as well as diverse art genres so as to further examine men’s styling at decisive points in fashion history.

 

 

Posted by Katy Dalli at 14:28 (0) comments
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