Special Issue of AJPC 7.1 – GLAM

Intellect is delighted to announce that the new issue of The Australasian Journal of Popular Culture is now available.

This Special Issue of AJPC focuses on popular culture across galleries, libraries, archives and museums (GLAM) with a focus on Australia.

Articles within this issue include (partial list):

Looking in on a special collection: Science fiction fanzines at Murdoch University Library

Authors: Jessie Lymn

Page Start: 23

The material remains of subcultural communities – in this case, fanzines – often present challenges in definition, classification and materiality, and this makes them valuable primary texts and source material for new knowledges and teaching. In this article, Lymn presents an argument for the sustained collection of science fiction fanzines within a university Special Collection, drawing on examples from the Murdoch University Library’s significant twentieth-century science fiction fanzine collection. Highlights include consideration of the records of everyday life that feature in the fanzines and the networked communities science fiction fanzines created through postal systems and other exchanges. The article argues that it is the form, content and networks of fanzines – what the author calls their ‘practices’ – that make them a unique site of research and of national historical significance, and an important part of a university’s special collection.

The curation of ancient Egypt in the twenty-first century: How should the present engage with the past?

Authors: Caroline Hubschmann

Page Start: 75

This article examines how museums and archaeologists present ancient Egypt to the public. For archaeology, the role of the museum is extremely significant as it is the most popular forum through which non-specialists interact with the discipline. But how often do archaeologists and Egyptologists consider the manner in which the public consumes antiquity? There is a persistent and continuing tension to develop a balance between the popular and accurate notions of ancient Egypt. Museums are a voice of authority and legitimacy; when ancient Egypt is exhibited and interpreted it must satisfy the curious fascination, while also allowing for the development of archaeological literacy. The former ensures people will visit the exhibition while the latter allows them to understand the content on a contextual and cultural level. Archaeologists must care how their discipline is perceived so that the audience can comprehend the fruits of the labour beyond that which is popularly ‘known’. The contemporary and future role of museology and Egyptian antiquities will also be discussed concerning the risk heritage places face in a world beset by conflict.

Souveniring paradise: Popular culture and creative identity at the Gold Coast

Authors: Virginia Rigney

Page Start: 169

This article reflects on the intersections between popular culture and contemporary art through the prism of curatorial and artistic practice presented within one small museum institution – Gold Coast City Gallery in Queensland, Australia. The purpose is to share the importance of the kinds of understandings that artists brought to the contemporary culture of the city and the way in which the museum, through collections, programmes and placing this work in critical dialogue with the community, sought to value a reading of popular culture for what it revealed about the city’s history and to make a contribution towards the ongoing wrestling of its evolving identity.

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