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NeMLA 2018 CFP
Convention Theme: “​Global Spaces, Local Landscapes and Imagined Worlds​”

With more than 2,000 members, NeMLA is the largest of the regional MLA affiliates

providing a remarkable opportunity for discussion and academic exchange.
 
Are you working in Media & Film Studies, Women’s Studies, Queer Studies,
Eco-criticism, Urban Ecology or Cultural Studies?​ NeMLA's annual convention is
an opportunity for scholars across the range of modern languages and literatures
to gather for four days of intensive scholarly inquiry and discovery.
 
More information can be found on the NeMLA website: www.buffalo.edu/nemla/convention/session.html
 
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New issue of the Journal of Italian Cinema & Media Studies – out now!

We are delighted to announce that the new issue of the Journal of Italian Cinema & Media Studies (5.3) is now available.


For more information about this issue please click here or email katy@intellectbooks.com.


Articles within this issue include (partial list):


In the place of abandonment: Rohrwacher, Martel and ‘miracles’

Authors: Ramsey McGlazer

Page Start: 305


This essay analyses Italian director Alice Rohrwacher’s Corpo celeste (2011) and Argentinean filmmaker Lucrecia Martel’s La ciénaga (2001) and considers the relation between the two films. Attending to the films’ shared interest in ‘miracles’ that are as minor and apparently inconsequential as they are elusive, I show that such miracles, reminiscent of others in recent critical theory, figure in both films as means of exiting or altering a present that otherwise appears foreclosed. Miracles become means of restoring what Gilles Deleuze calls ‘belief in the world’, however minimally. In this way, both Corpo celeste and La ciénaga point to the continued salience of Deleuze’s account in Cinema 2 of suspended action and subsequent ‘learning to see’. But both films also foreground, differently and in ways that Deleuze could not have foreseen, the difficulties of such learning in contexts of impasse, economic crisis, austerity and abandonment.


Viaggio in Francia: Pathé Italian-French co-productions in the 1950s and 1960s

Authors: Paolo Palma

Page Start: 333


The article explores some recurring features found in Pathé’s Italian-French co-productions in the 1950s and 1960s, addressing this corpus of films as a representative sample of the larger co-production trends between the two countries in the period under discussion. The analysis is based on the examination of unpublished documents as well as press material from the archives of the Fondation Seydoux-Pathé (Seydoux-Pathé Foundation) and the Cinémathèque française (French Film Library). As the article evidences, co-productions served as a powerful instrument of transnational cultural exchange, modern marketing practices, and the rethinking and revisiting of country-specific genres. They also paved the way for the exportation and popularization of Italian actors, directors and cinematic style across France. Great attention is paid to how the French specialist and popular press received such co-productions, whether the films’ dual nationality affected their reception and to what extent co-productions contributed to the image of Italian cinema in post-war France.


Politicize and popularize: The theoretical discourse on feminicide in Italian feminist blogs

Authors: Nicholetta Mandolini

Page Start: 357

The concept of feminicide (‘femminicidio’) has been recently introduced to the Italian socio-political context and since 2012 a prolific theoretical debate on the topic has begun, both on traditional media and on the Internet. This article aims at analysing the current online discussion on feminicide and, in particular, the synergy of dialogue and activism which has appeared within the domain of feminist blogs. Drawing from the theoretical and methodological framework of Foucauldian Critical Discourse Analysis (FCDA), my objective is to investigate the bloggers’ ability to promote existing theories on sexist murders for a larger readership (popularization) and to redefine the notion of feminicide with new socially relevant meanings capable of extending the discursive perimeter of existing feminist theories on the phenomenon (politicization).

Read more Posted by Katy Dalli at 11:17 (0) comments
Applied Theatre Research announcement

We are delighted to announce that Applied Theatre Research has now been indexed by SCOPUS.


ATR is the worldwide journal for theatre and drama in non-traditional contexts. It focuses on drama, theatre and performance with specific audiences or participants in a range of social contexts and locations.

The primary audience consists of practitioners and scholars of drama, theatre and allied arts, as well as educationists, teachers, social workers and community leaders with an awareness of the significance of theatre and drama, and an interest in innovative and holistic approaches to theatrical and dramatic production, learning and community development. Contributors include eminent and experienced workers and scholars in the field, but cutting-edge contemporary and experimental work from new or little-known practitioners is also encouraged.

This double-blind peer-reviewed journal has a global focus and representation, with an explicit policy of ensuring that the best and most exciting work in all continents and as many countries as possible is represented and featured. Cultural, geographical, gender and socio-economic equity are recognised where possible, including in the Review Board.

To access the journal’s Call for Papers please click here.

Read more Posted by Katy Dalli at 16:46 (0) comments
Metal Music Studies 3.2 – out now!

Intellect is delighted to announce that the new issue of Metal Music Studies (3.2) is now available.

For more information about this issue, please click here or email katy@intellectbooks.com.

 

Articles within this issue include (partial list):

 

‘Delightfully Depressing’: Death/doom metal music world and the emotional responses of the fan

Authors: M. Selim Yavuz

Page Start: 201

 

Death/doom metal music, from both sides of the name, usually occupies itself with the darker spectrum of human emotion. Depression, melancholy and death are common themes in the music and in the reception of this music from an outsider point of view. In line with symbolic interactionism, these emotional responses differ significantly when they originate from a well-socialized member of this music world. This suggests that one may think of emotional responses as conventions of a music world. Common responses provide an emotional repertoire for members, and furthermore they become an adhesive for the community. In this article, I discuss my research of the fans of death/doom metal and explore the ways in which the fan responds to the music while contemplating on how death/doom functions in the lives of these fans.

 

From DJ to djent-step: Technology and the re-coding of metal music since the 1980s

Authors: Mark Marrington

Page Start: 251

 

This article considers the ways in which metal has interacted with the aesthetics of electronic music since the 1980s, from its earliest exchanges with hip hop through to recent developments in the djent subgenre. It highlights the persistence of metal’s practitioners in adopting new technologies (including samplers, drum machines and Digital Audio Workstations) and the challenges that this has brought to established ideas of conventional metal music practice. Underlying the discussion is the notion of the ‘code’, a familiar term in metal music studies, which has been employed to articulate ideas of metal’s core musical attributes. In these terms, electronic music’s creative practices can be seen to have facilitated both the deconstruction and re-contextualization of metal’s code, enabling the genre to be re-imagined and ultimately enriched.

 

Female rhetoric: Identity, persona and the academic and popular divide in the (cultural and critical) study of metal

Authors: Mark J. Porrovecchio

Page Start: 329

 

There has been a substantial amount of productive scholarship, particularly in the areas of critical and cultural studies, regarding the depictions of women in metal music. At the same time, there remains a divide between this important academic work and those who are popular consumers of metal. This short essay offers a potential middle path between the two. Through the use of interviews with three women involved in creating content related to metal, the author offers a two-part suggestion: (1) that the divide itself might be a matter less of content than of translation and (2) that rhetoric, of the sort practiced in departments of speech communication, could potentially provide another useful option when presenting scholarship to popular audiences.

 

Read more Posted by Katy Dalli at 16:35 (0) comments
New issue of Applied Theatre Research – out now!

Intellect is delighted to announce that the new issue of Applied Theatre Research (5.1) is now available.

 

For more information about this issue please click here or email katy@intellectbooks.com.

 

Articles within this issue include (partial list):

 

The ‘diverse economies’ of applied theatre

Authors: Molly Mullen

Page Start: 7

 

Some of the perennial tensions in applied theatre arise from the ways in which practice is funded or financed. They include the immediate material pressures and pragmatic dilemmas faced by theatre makers on the ground and the struggle to secure the resources needed to produce and sustain work or to negotiate the dynamics and demands of particular funding relationships. In the applied theatre literature, there are many examples of groups and organizations that have compromised their political, pedagogic, artistic or ethical principles to make their work economically viable. There are also ongoing debates about the nature of the relationship between applied theatre and the local, national and global economic conditions in which it is produced. These debates examine the extent to which economic conditions shape the forms and intentions of socially committed theatre movements over time. This article takes a practice-based approach, drawing on fieldwork conducted in 2012 with three applied theatre companies: Applied Theatre Consultants Ltd in New Zealand; C&T in the UK; and FM Theatre Power in Hong Kong. This multi-sited organizational ethnography generates critical insights into the ways in which these companies bring social and artistic values to bear on business models and financial relationships. Analysis of the companies’ practice takes seriously the aim of J.K. Gibson-Graham’s (2006) diverse economies project: to imagine and create spaces of economic possibility. Organizational, management and economic processes can be insidious technologies by which capitalist/neo-liberal ideologies infiltrate socially committed theatre and performance. But they can also be critically informed practices, involving considerable ethical consideration, creativity and care.

 

Applied theatre evaluations as technologies of government: A critical exploration of key logics in the field

Authors: Kelly Freebody and Susan Goodwin

Page Start: 23

 

This article aims to raise new questions for the field through the analysis of a set of applied theatre programme evaluation documents. The analysis of these three documents was undertaken using Bacchi’s (2009) ‘What’s the problem represented to be?’ (WPR) approach. This approach is increasingly being used for the critical analysis of public policy and social programme documents in a wide range of policy fields, but is not commonly utilized in the field of applied theatre. The WPR approach, it is argued, enables critical scrutiny of taken-for-granted representations of what applied theatre does, or can do, about social ‘problems’. Analysing applied theatre programme evaluation documents as representations of social ‘problems’ provides an opportunity to explore some of the deep-seated logics at work in the field.

 

Performing partnership: The possibilities of decentring the expertise of international practitioners in international Theatre for Development partnerships

Authors: Bobby Smith

Page Start: 37

 

Building effective global partnerships are a key focus of the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs), which will shape how international development looks until 2030. This article explores how international partnerships in applied theatre/Theatre for Development (TfD) initiatives are performed, and draws on the author’s own experience of being employed on a freelance basis by a non-governmental organization (NGO) to build on the skills of a Ugandan team to utilize theatre. Throughout the article, key moments during a month-long period of training are reflected upon and analyzed with reference to debates within international development, postcolonial studies and applied theatre. Through synergizing these debates, it is suggested that a decentring of Western ‘expertise’ enables more effective partnerships to emerge.

 

Read more Posted by Katy Dalli at 15:30 (0) comments
CFP for Artifact: Journal of Design Practice 1.1

We are delighted to announce that we are publishing our first ever open access journal, Artifact: Journal of Design Practice.

Since its first publication in 2007, Artifact has focused on practice-based design research and aims to explore conditions, issues and tasks pertaining to design development in a broad sense, As an international design research journal, Artifact targets the global design research community with the aim of strengthening knowledge sharing and theory building of relevance to design practice. All articles and research notes are subject to double-blind peer-review.

Artifact is a fully open access journal. From 2018, all articles (including those in back volumes) will be available to download free from Intellect’s home page on IngentaConnect: http://www.ingentaconnect.com/content/intellect.

 

CFP for an inaugural special issue: ‘What is design practice?' https://www.intellectbooks.co.uk/MediaManager/File/CFP%20-%20Artifact.pdf

Read more Posted by Katy Dalli at 11:06 (0) comments
New Cinemas: Journal of Contemporary Film 13.2 – out now!

Intellect is delighted to announce that the new issue of New Cinemas: Journal of Contemporary Film (13.2) is now available.

 

For more information about this issue, please click here or email katy@intellectbooks.com.

 

Articles within this issue include (partial list):

 

Remembering objects in the essay film: Andrés di Tella as heir, archaeologist and collector

Authors: Gustavo Procopio Furtado

Page Start: 123

 

Although Andrés di Tella is among the leading documentary filmmakers in South America, his work has received scant attention in the Anglophone world. Di Tella’s essayistic films mix personal and intimate perspectives with public and historical concerns, crafting a tentative filmic voice that is articulated on the borders between the public and the private. In his subjective explorations of personal and collective pasts, di Tella calls on material objects to play a vital role. Subjective recollections are accompanied by the constitution of collections of objects, material items that are the remainders from and the keys to the past. Remembering is remembering with and through things and senses of self and identity are forged and questioned in dialogue with constellations of objects. This article examines the interaction between subjects and objects in di Tella’s work with special attention to Fotografías (Photographs, 2007) and Hachazos (Ax Blows, 2011).

 

Inglourious Basterds: Satirizing the spectator and revealing the ‘Nazi’ within

Authors: Andrew Chrystall

Page Start: 153

 

This article presents Tarantino’s Inglourious Basterds as a ‘masterpiece’ of metacinema that satirizes its audience(s) directly. The particular focus is how Tarantino creates and leverages a network of analogical relations and/or resonances to reflect and/or fold spectators back upon themselves and make us (the viewing audience) the butt or (Private) ‘Butz’ of his joke. This article also argues that Tarantino attacks and manipulates the viewer’s sensibilities and perceptions with a view to affording them a shock of recognition − exposing audiences to their enjoyment (and, by extension, complicity in the co-production) of on-screen violence and their willingness to be manipulated by the director into a position that parallels that of the in-film Nazi audience − and, thereby enabling spectators to see themselves and their relations to film more clearly.

 

Non-affirmative time-images in Nuri Bilge Ceylan’s Three Monkeys (2008) and the political aesthetics of New Turkish Cinema

Authors: Vuslat D. Katsansis

Page Start: 169

 

This article reads Nuri Bilge Ceylan’s award-winning 2008 feature, Three Monkeys, which marks a significant maturity in the political aesthetics developed in New Turkish Cinema over the past fifteen years. Drawing from Deleuze’s theory of the cinematic time-image, and situating the film within Turkey’s particularly turbulent political climate, I try to show how stillness, non-reciprocal sound, ambiguous plot time and extensive long takes in Three Monkeys showcase New Turkish Cinema’s potential to articulate political critique.

Read more Posted by Katy Dalli at 10:37 (0) comments
New Cinemas: Journal of Contemporary Film 13.2 – out now!

Intellect is delighted to announce that the new issue of New Cinemas: Journal of Contemporary Film (13.2) is now available.

 

For more information about this issue, please click here or email katy@intellectbooks.com.

 

Articles within this issue include (partial list):

 

Remembering objects in the essay film: Andrés di Tella as heir, archaeologist and collector

Authors: Gustavo Procopio Furtado

Page Start: 123

 

Although Andrés di Tella is among the leading documentary filmmakers in South America, his work has received scant attention in the Anglophone world. Di Tella’s essayistic films mix personal and intimate perspectives with public and historical concerns, crafting a tentative filmic voice that is articulated on the borders between the public and the private. In his subjective explorations of personal and collective pasts, di Tella calls on material objects to play a vital role. Subjective recollections are accompanied by the constitution of collections of objects, material items that are the remainders from and the keys to the past. Remembering is remembering with and through things and senses of self and identity are forged and questioned in dialogue with constellations of objects. This article examines the interaction between subjects and objects in di Tella’s work with special attention to Fotografías (Photographs, 2007) and Hachazos (Ax Blows, 2011).

 

Inglourious Basterds: Satirizing the spectator and revealing the ‘Nazi’ within

Authors: Andrew Chrystall

Page Start: 153

 

This article presents Tarantino’s Inglourious Basterds as a ‘masterpiece’ of metacinema that satirizes its audience(s) directly. The particular focus is how Tarantino creates and leverages a network of analogical relations and/or resonances to reflect and/or fold spectators back upon themselves and make us (the viewing audience) the butt or (Private) ‘Butz’ of his joke. This article also argues that Tarantino attacks and manipulates the viewer’s sensibilities and perceptions with a view to affording them a shock of recognition − exposing audiences to their enjoyment (and, by extension, complicity in the co-production) of on-screen violence and their willingness to be manipulated by the director into a position that parallels that of the in-film Nazi audience − and, thereby enabling spectators to see themselves and their relations to film more clearly.

 

Non-affirmative time-images in Nuri Bilge Ceylan’s Three Monkeys (2008) and the political aesthetics of New Turkish Cinema

Authors: Vuslat D. Katsansis

Page Start: 169

 

This article reads Nuri Bilge Ceylan’s award-winning 2008 feature, Three Monkeys, which marks a significant maturity in the political aesthetics developed in New Turkish Cinema over the past fifteen years. Drawing from Deleuze’s theory of the cinematic time-image, and situating the film within Turkey’s particularly turbulent political climate, I try to show how stillness, non-reciprocal sound, ambiguous plot time and extensive long takes in Three Monkeys showcase New Turkish Cinema’s potential to articulate political critique.

Read more Posted by Katy Dalli at 10:34 (0) comments
Studies in Costume & Performance 2.1 – out now!

Intellect is delighted to announce that the new issue of Studies in Costume & Performance (2.1) is now available.

 

For more information about this issue please click here or email katy@intellectbooks.com.

 

Articles within this issue include (partial list):

 

Hand in Glove: Reflections on a performed costume exhibition and the stories behind the garments

Authors: Mary Kate Connolly

Page Start: 9

 

This article details a conversation with seminal choreographer Lea Anderson, following her performed exhibition, Hand in Glove, which was staged at the V&A Museum, London, in April 2016. Hand in Glove featured over 300 costumes and accessories from the archives of Anderson’s two renowned contemporary dance companies, The Cholmondeleys and The Featherstonehaughs. These companies played a prominent role in the evolution of British contemporary dance from the 1980s until their dissolution in 2011. Costume and design have long been utilized as transformative elements within Anderson’s work, giving rise to characteristic intertextual layering, blurring of boundaries and the destabilization of hetero-normative representations of the dancing body. Hand in Glove occupied the Raphael Gallery at the V&A from 22 to 24 April 2016 with vignettes from ten of Anderson’s works performed by students from London Contemporary Dance School. The conversation with Anderson outlines the process involved in the mounting of Hand in Glove alongside accounts of her early works, and the influence which design and costume exert in her choreography. Anderson describes her collaborations with designers, in particular Sandy Powell and Simon Vincenzi, and the ways in which her work with costume has evolved over time. Reflections on the implications of the exhibition itself (as a rare opportunity to view costumes performed live within a gallery space) are thus placed within the wider context of her choreographic practice and visual influences.

 

Brides and widows: Iconic dress and identity in Howard Barker’s costumes

Authors: Lara Maleen Kipp

Page Start: 27

 

One of the strongest recurring motifs in the work of contemporary British playwright Howard Barker is women’s marital status: brides and widows abound in his work. Their status as such is often crucially configured, but also subverted through their costumes (in a Western cultural context). This article considers the central role that brides and widows play in a variety of Barker’s dramatic texts and identifies some core working principles with regard to his use of costume. It explores the notion of the iconic garment, as proposed by Hannah in 2014, and its influence on these characters’ identities. Drawing on aesthetic discourse, in particular that of the sublime, I analyse how Barker proposes a reconsideration of stable subject identity through these recognizable, yet ambiguous and unstable female figures.

 

Australia on display: Tracing an Australian identity through the evolving costume design for The Australian Ballet’s production The Display

Authors: Emily Collett and Roger Alsop

Page Start: 61

 

The topic of costume for performance as a marker of national identity is in its infancy within the context of theatre studies. As the means by which an audience relates to character and narrative, costume is central to our understanding of identity. Here, we consider costume for performance, specifically for dance, in Australia as an indicator of the developing national identity, using the 1964, 1983 and 2012 Australian Ballet productions of The Display as a case study. The original 1964 costumes were credited to expatriate artist Sidney Nolan, the 1983 version was designed by Sydney fashion designer Adele Weiss and the 2012 remount utilized photographs, written documentation and memories to recreate the original 1964 costumes. By examining the three sets of costumes, we aim to demonstrate how a study of the costumed body offers insights into Australia’s evolving national character.

 

Read more Posted by Katy Dalli at 11:38 (0) comments
New issue of Journal of Contemporary Chinese Art 4.1 - out now!

Intellect is delighted to announce that the new issue of the Journal of Contemporary Chinese Art (4.1) is now available.

 

For more information about this issue please click here or email katy@intellectbooks.com.

 

Articles within this issue include (partial list):

 

New Silk Road artworlds: The art of hybrid and the marginal at the Xinjiang Contemporary Art Museum

Authors: Darren Byler

Page Start: 27

 

Since the early 2000s many second-tier Chinese cities have begun to cultivate contemporary art scenes. Ürümchi, the capital city of the north-west province of Xinjiang, is no exception. Following Xi Jinping’s announcement of the New Silk Road Economic Belt in 2013, a group of artists from the city received support from the Xinjiang Cultural Ministry to transform a decommissioned government building into the Xinjiang Contemporary Art Museum. Many of the exhibitions hosted in the space focus not only on themes of Silk Road revitalisation but also representations of migration, frontier marginalisation and the spectacle of rapid capitalist development. One outcome of this is the emergence of contemporary art rooted in the ‘hybrid’ traditions of Uyghur artists. In addition, a school of Han migrant documentary photography and figurative painting, which the art critic, curator and painter Zeng Qunkai has called ‘black and white marginality’, has begun to emerge.

 

Between global models and local resources: Building private art museums in Shanghai’s West Bund

Authors: Giulia Zennaro

Page Start: 61

 

Increasingly, the establishment of museums has developed as a strategy for improving local attractiveness and economy. Recently, in China, art museums – often in private form – have witnessed a rapid development. However, despite enhanced governmental support, some of these new art endeavours still face challenges in their operation. I argue that a major factor contributing to these obstacles can be found in the relation between local governments’ ambitions to design museums similarly to other world-renowned ones (isomorphism) and the availability of local resources and expertise. In particular, my case study on the Long Museum and the Yuz Museum (in the Shanghai West Bund) shows how focusing on the achievement of globally favoured aesthetic standards vis-à-vis local resources to enhance the credibility of these new undertakings (legitimacy) has occasionally obstructed organisational efficiency, specifically in this case, of the museums’ function to store and display art.

 

From context to subject: The poetics and politics of creating and exhibiting artworks in the National Museum of China

Authors: Tongyun Yin

Page Start: 101

 

Prior to its renovation and reopening in 2011, the National Museum of China, originally the Museum of Chinese History and the Museum of Chinese Revolution sharing the same building structure, has been the official trustee and the authoritative voice of Chinese history since 1949. However, in the past five years, the Museum has significantly shifted its focus from history to art as the pace of the nation’s socioeconomic transition accelerated, a tendency summarised in its mission to transform the Museum into the “largest art and history museum” in the world. Based on the studies of the exhibitions held at the Museum in the past few decades, this paper examines the transformation of the exhibitionary practices of the NMC first through the lens of artworks created by official commissions in Socialist China and by reconstructing cultural relics into ‘Chinese art’ in post-Socialist China. Then, it analyses the altering interpretative narratives and presentational approaches used to exhibit artworks against the nation’s rapidly changing social-cultural and economic contexts. The article aims to analyse the changing roles played by art to foster and uphold shifting discourses to justify the Party-State’s political legitimation and promote cultural nationalism for nation-building. It further reveals how power, politics and ideology operate in exhibitions in contemporary China.

 

Read more Posted by Katy Dalli at 11:48 (0) comments